Lifestyle

Preservation of Common Fruit and Vegetables by Dehydration

Preservation of Common Fruit and Vegetables: Years ago, when I was just beginning to get serious about putting together a food storage plan, my husband and I decided to purchase a side of beef from a local farmer. Our extra chest freezer was in a detached garage about 20 feet from the house,

 

and we loaded it up with all the wonderful cuts we had asked the processor to wrap for us. That chest freezer was full of frozen meat, vegetables, and fruit with enough to last for months and months of homemade meals. It was fantastic—and stupid.

 

Drying (dehydratingfood is one of the oldest and easiest methods of food preservation. Preservation of Common Fruit and Vegetables.

 

The rule of food preservation is to make sure that you do not put all your eggs in one basket; that is to say, you need to have your food stored in at least some better separate ways. In this post, we’ll take the guesswork out of dehydrating your favorite fruit and vegetables.

 

You may even find food that you did not know you could dry for home storage. Each entry lists the best way to clean, cut, dry, and rehydrate individual items for future use in your prepared pantry.

 

Remember Tips

Clean Fruit and Vegetables

Every mother would strive to feed her family only the freshest, organic produce available because no one wants to introduce chemicals and pesticides into their children’s daily meals. Unfortunately, purchasing organic produce is not always easy on your budget. You may also find that you have access to large quantities of fresh produce, but it is not organic. Fortunately, there is an option for cleaning fruit and vegetables that do get sprayed with chemicals. You can clean off more than 95 percent of pesticides if you are diligent in this process.

 

I first learned this technique from Daisy Luther on her blog The Organic Prepper. These instructions are adapted from her book, The Prepper’s Canning Guide.

 

Use this process for cleaning all of your fruit and vegetables before processing them for dehydrating. Not only does it remove pesticides and traces of fertilizer, but it also removes plain old dirt. It may add an extra step, but it’s worth it. The best part of all is that you already have these items in your pantry.

 

1 Put 1 cup baking soda and a squirt of all-natural dish soap into a sink or tub full of hot water. For more delicate produce, like berries, use cool water.

 

2 Soak the produce the solution for around 20 minutes. You may see a disturbing white film of gunk ascend to the top of the water. That means it is working and the vegetables are getting clean.

 

3 Drain the sink and rinse the produce. Sturdy produce can be rinsed under a steady stream of water. For delicate produce, scrub your sink or tub clean, fill it with cool fresh water, and swish the produce around in the clean water to rinse it.

 

4 Using a cloth, scrub the outside of thick-skinned, firm produce like apples. Let delicate produce drain in a colander.

 

5 If you are still able to see a film or if the rinse water is cloudy, clean out the sink with white vinegar and repeat.

 

Leafy Greens Wash

Leafy greens like lettuce, spinach, and cilantro can be a problem to clean thoroughly, and according to the CDC, they are more likely to be contaminated with E. coli bacteria. This natural wash was found to kill 98 percent of bacteria on produce. It’s simple to do and uses materials straight from your pantry.

 

Mix 3 cups cool water and 1 cup distilled white vinegar in a bowl or shallow tub. Enable your greens to soak the bowl for around two minutes, and after that flush them well.

 

 

Apple

Preservation of Common Fruit and Vegetables

 

Apples are first on the list and are possibly the easiest fruit to start dehydrating. Once you have them clean, they require only a little preparation. We get a kick out of the chance to leave the skin on our apples for extra fiber and nutrition. They make a healthy snack all on their own.

 

Clean: For nonorganic apples, follow the cleaning tips on (Remember). Wash organic applies with warm water. Dry apples with a cloth.

 

How to prepare: Use an apple peeler/corer for consistently sized cuts. Otherwise, core and slice into eight equal-sized pieces, or use a mandoline slicer.

 

Suggested thickness: ⅛ inch for chips; small chop for baking

 

Drying time: 6 to 12 hours, depending on thickness

 

Temperature: 125°F Consistency when dry: Leathery to crisp, with no moisture in the middle

 

Blanching requirements: N/A Oxidizing treatment: Treat cut pieces with ascorbic acid or lemon juice.

 

How to rehydrate: Pour boiling water over the dried apples until just covered and let pieces soak for 30 minutes, or until they rehydrate to the consistency you are looking for.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like cooked apples (soft)

 

Yield: 2 to 3 medium apples = 1 cup dried apples = 1¼ cups dehydrated apples

 

 

Apricots

 

Apricots are worth waiting for, even with their extended drying time. Use rehydrated in pies and other desserts, and dried as a healthy snack.

 

Clean: For non-organic apricots, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. Wash organic apricots with warm water, then dry.

 

How to prepare: Remove pit. No need to remove skins.

 

Suggested thickness: Cut in half or in quarters for quicker drying time.

 

Drying time: 8 to 12 hours for quarters; 12 to 24 hours for halves.

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Leathery

 

Blanching requirements: N/A

 

Oxidizing treatment: Use lemon juice or ascorbic acid, if you want them to retain their light color.

 

How to rehydrate: Soak in hot water or warmed juice for 15 to 20 minutes, or simmer on the stovetop, until the fruit is plump and has absorbed the water.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Soft and plump

 

Yield: 2 pounds fresh apricots = 6 ounces dried apricots = 2 cups rehydrated apricots

 

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Asparagus

Asparagus is a beloved vegetable at our house, and we can eat it every day for weeks.The developing season is short, and when asparagus is out of season, it is expensive. In order to save money on our favorite veggie and keep it on the table, we dehydrate it as much as possible. Process dried pieces into powder and add it to the soup.

 

Clean: For non-organic asparagus, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. For organic asparagus, wash with warm water and pat dry well.

 

How to prepare: Cut off tough ends first.

 

Suggested thickness: 1-inch pieces Drying time: 8 to 12 hours

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Brittle

 

Blanching requirements: Three to four minutes

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Cover 1 cup asparagus with 2¼ cups of boiling water and soak for 30 minutes, or add dried pieces directly to the soup.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Soft, like cooking

 

Yield: 2 cups fresh asparagus = 1 cup dried asparagus = 1½ cups rehydrated asparagus

If you sort your cut asparagus pieces onto dehydrator trays by thickness, you will save time and additional work. The spear tips dry quite a bit faster than the fibrous stalks, so keeping them on separate trays saves you the time and effort of fishing them out from many pieces that have not finished drying.

Bananas

Achieving the texture of locally acquired banana chips is almost impossible for the home nourishment processor that does not want unnecessary additives on their fruit. Did you know that in order to achieve that extra sweetness and crispness, they actually dip the bananas in sugar syrup and deep fry it? I’m assuming that you want to get away from the extra additives and calories as you are dehydrating fresh bananas for your food storage.

 

Used rehydrated banana in smoothies and in cereals, or chill the pieces and serve them on their own. Or, just enjoy as chips!

 

Clean: Wash and dry, then peel. There is no special treatment for organic versus nonorganic.

 

How to prepare: The best tasting bananas are slightly green at the top and have a few brown spots on the peel. Use overripe bananas in leather.

 

Suggested thickness: ⅛-inch rounds for chips

 

Drying time: 8 to 12 hours

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Brittle, snaps easily

 

Blanching requirements: N/A

 

Oxidizing treatment: Dip or spray with lemon juice to prevent browning.

 

How to rehydrate: Mix one part water to one part chips, then simmer at a low temperature for five minutes.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like fresh

 

Yield: 5 large bananas = 2 cups dried bananas = 4 cups rehydrated bananas

 

 

Beans (Green, Yellow, Snap)

If you are looking for a pantry-stable vegetable that is easy to dry and good for you, the green bean is it. While we do like to eat fresh beans from the garden, I prefer to purchase beans in large frozen bags from the grocery store to use for dehydrating. This is because I do not enjoy the process of cutting and blanching that is required for fresh beans. Thankfully, the local store has an excellent selection of organic beans, so my processing time is reduced to practically nothing. The peak season for green beans is from April to October, and you will get about 3 cups of beans per pound.

 

Clean: For nonorganic beans, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. For organic beans, wash with warm water and pat dry.

 

How to prepare: Remove strings if necessary. Cut before blanching. You do not need to prepare if dehydrating from the frozen state.

 

Suggested thickness: 1½-inch pieces, or cut lengthwise into 4-inch-long thin strips

 

Drying time: 8 to 14 hours

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Hard, brittle

 

Blanching requirements: Boil or steam blanch for two to three minutes.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Cover 1 cup green beans in 2¼ cups warm water and soak for 30 minutes until plump. Or, add directly to the soup without rehydrating.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like fresh

 

Yield: 2 cups fresh beans = 1 cup dried beans = 2 cups rehydrated beans

 

Beets

Harvest beets for storage late in the fall before the ground freezes. They have the best flavor when they are 2 inches in diameter. Except for gold varieties, beets will “bleed” away from their color when cut.

 

Clean: For organic and nonorganic beets, scrub clean with a vegetable brush and warm water.

 

How to prepare: Cover with water and cook in a large saucepan until tender, about 45 minutes. Place the pot under running cold water and rinse until beets can be handled.

 

Suggested thickness: Peel, then cut into ⅛-inch strips.

 

Drying time: 8 to 12 hours; stir at four-hour mark.

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Hard

 

Blanching requirements: N/A

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Cover 1 cup dry beets in 2¾ cups warm water for one and a half hours.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like cooked

 

Yield: 2 cups fresh beets = 1 cup dried beets = 1½ cups rehydrated beets

 

Add 2 tablespoons of lemon juice or vinegar to the cooking water. This will help to keep the beets from bleeding.

 

 

Blueberries

If you are lucky enough to be able to grow blueberries in your own home garden, you’re in for a treat. Dehydrated blueberries are fairly easy to make and will keep for over a year if stored properly in a cool, dry part of your pantry. Skip the processing time and use frozen berries.

 

Just as with processing cranberries, the outer shell of the blueberry needs to be pierced to make sure the heat reaches the inside and allows the berry to dry completely. This is accomplished by piercing each berry individually, which is time-consuming, or adding them whole to a metal strainer and submerging in boiling water for 30 seconds. If using frozen berries, it is not necessary to do the additional water bath processing or piercing.

 

Clean: For nonorganic blueberries, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. Rinse delicately. Rinse organic berries with warm water and dry delicately.

 

How to prepare: Remove stems. Pierce each berry with a skewer or pin, blanch for 30 seconds, or freeze until solid.

 

Suggested thickness: Leave whole

 

Drying time: 10 to 18 hours

 

Temperature: 125 to 135°F

 

Consistency when dry: Hard, will not stick together when squeezed Blanching requirements: See notes above.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Submerge in cool water for 10 to 15 minutes.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Not as plump or juicy as fresh. In baked goods, use without rehydrating to keep moisture content down.

 

Yield: 2 pints fresh blueberries = 1 cup dried blueberries = 2 cups rehydrated blueberries

 

 

Broccoli

Broccoli is wonderful to have in the pantry. I like to powder broccoli stalks to use when making broccoli soup. Dried florets can be rehydrated for soup, stew, or even for cooking as a side dish. Look for a head with deep color and closed flowers.

 

Clean: For nonorganic broccoli, follow the cleaning tips on remember tips. For organic broccoli, wash with warm water and pat dry.

 

How to prepare: Cut the head from the stalk. Separate the florets into equal-size pieces. Chop the stalk into equal-size chunks.

 

Suggested thickness: Equal-size pieces Drying time: 8 to 12 hours; stalks may take longer.

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Crisp

 

Blanching requirements: For florets, water blanch for two minutes or steam blanch for three minutes. For stalks, cook in boiling water for five minutes until tender, then drain.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Soak 1 cup broccoli in 2 cups water. Soak until liquid stops absorbing, for 30 to 60 minutes. There’s no need to soak if you’re adding the broccoli to a recipe that has water and requires cooking.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Tastes fresh, although not crunchy

 

Yield: 2 cups fresh broccoli = 1 cup dried broccoli = 2 cups rehydrated broccoli.

 

 

Carrots

Carrots are a staple in my pantry. We use them several times a week in stir-fry meals and soups. They lose over 80 percent of their water during the dehydrating process and will shrink down to practically nothing when they are dry. Take this into account and use tray inserts when you are drying them, or you may find that they have fallen through to the bottom of your dehydrator.

 

Clean: For nonorganic carrots, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips and scrub with a vegetable brush. For organic carrots, place in a colander and scrub with a vegetable brush and warm water. No need to peel.

 

How to prepare: Slice off the top and bottom ⅛ inch, slice into rounds or cubes.

 

Suggested thickness: ⅛-inch rounds; ¼-inch cubes; shredded

 

Drying time: 10 to 12 hours

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Hard, brittle

 

Blanching requirements: Blanch for three to four minutes in boiling water, until they are bright orange.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: To get a like-raw texture, soak in cool water for 15 to 30 minutes. For cooked carrots, combine carrots and water in a one to one ratio, bring to a boil, cover, and reduce heat to low for 10 minutes. Add directly to soup or stew without rehydrating.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Anywhere from crunchy to just-cooked, depending on the rehydrating method

 

Yield: 2 cups fresh carrots = 1 cup dried carrots = 1¼ cups rehydrated carrots

 

 

Cauliflower

The peak season for cauliflower is September to November, and the average size of a head is 2 pounds. Each pound of fresh cauliflower will lose 75 percent of its water and become ¼ pound when dried, so dehydrating is a nice way to extend the shelf life of this healthy vegetable.

 

Clean: Wash organic and nonorganic cauliflower with warm water and dry. If the heads are fresh from the garden, soak in salt water for 10 minutes to dislodge any bugs.

 

How to prepare: Remove large stalks and outer leaves.

 

Suggested thickness: Cut into small, 1- to 2-inch, uniform-size florets, or rice the cauliflower and set it to dry on fruit leather trays.

 

Drying time: 8 to 12 hours

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Crisp Blanching requirements: To keep the florets white, steam four to five minutes. Skip this step if you will be using it as an ingredient and the color isn’t important. Cook large stalks until soft, cut, and add to trays.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Soak 1 cup cauliflower in 1 cup water for 15 to 20 minutes.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like cooked

 

Yield: 4 cups fresh cauliflower = 1 cup dried cauliflower = 4 cups rehydrated cauliflower

 

 

Celery

Celery is such a versatile vegetable, but most people rarely use the whole stalk before it goes bad. We dehydrate ours, so there is always a supply on hand for soup and stew. Don’t forget to grind it and make celery salt for adding a savory flavor to salads and spice blends. One head of celery fills two trays of my Nesco Gardenmaster dehydrator. The pieces will dry to half their size, so consider adding a catch tray so the smaller pieces won’t slip through.

 

Clean: For nonorganic celery, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. For organic celery, wash with warm water and pat dry.

 

How to prepare: Cut off the ends and separate the stalks. If you are making celery powder, keep the leaves.

 

Suggested thickness: ½-inch chunks

 

Drying time: Four hours for leaves; 8 to 12 hours for stalk pieces

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Crisp

 

Blanching requirements: Steam for one minute if planning to rehydrate into whole pieces. Skip if you’re planning to make powder.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Place whole pieces in warm water for 10 to 15 minutes, or add directly to soup or stew.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Soft, like cooked

Yield: 3 cups fresh celery = 1 cup dried celery = 2 cups rehydrated celery

 

 

Cucumber

Clean: For nonorganic cucumbers, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. For organic cucumbers, wash with warm water, then dry.

 

How to prepare: Slice into rounds.

 

Suggested thickness: ¼ inch thick Drying time: Four to six hours

 

Temperature: 135°F

 

Consistency when dry: Brittle; should snap when bent.

 

Blanching requirements: N/A

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Soak in cool water for 30 to 60 minutes.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Fresh tasting, limp texture

 

Yield: 1 cup fresh cucumber = ¼ cup dehydrated cucumber = ¾ cup rehydrated cucumber

 

 

Citrus

Purchase thin-skinned citrus for the best flavor and juice. The peels can be used whole or made into powder for various recipes. Dried pieces can be steeped in vinegar to aid in cleaning, added to water for a tasty drink, or made into candied rinds. The pith can be used to make natural pectin. Powder the dried peels and mix with sugar, make lemon pepper spice, or add to scones and baked goods. Use in place of extract or zest.

 

All store-bought citrus must be washed to remove the wax coating before dehydrating.

 

Clean: For nonorganic citrus fruits, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. For organic fruits, wash with warm water then dry.

 

How to prepare: Use a mandoline for even cuts. Save the ends to dry for use in the vinegar-based cleaner. Remove the pith and cut into strips.

 

Suggested thickness: ⅛-inch sliced rounds

 

Drying time: Four to eight hours Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Crisp

 

Blanching requirements: N/A

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Cover with cool water for 10 to 15 minutes.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like fresh

Yield: 1 medium orange or 2 to 3 lemons = 1 cup dehydrated citrus rounds = 1 tablespoon citrus powder = ¾ cup rehydrated citrus rounds

 

 

Corn

We eat a lot of corn but do not grow it ourselves because of where we live. Central Texas is corn country, and there are acres and acres of GMO corn growing in the field right next door. Corn is a wind-pollinated crop, and it is likely that there would be cross-pollination between the GMO corn and the open pollinated crops I would be growing. Instead, I purchase frozen organic corn in big bags from Costco. This saves us a ton of prep time because there is no cutting or blanching required.

 

Clean: For nonorganic corn, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. For organic corn, wash with warm water and pat dry. No need to clean if using frozen corn.

 

How to prepare: Shuck the ears and clean each corn cob, removing all tassels. Place whole cobs in boiling water and cook until tender, six to eight minutes. Transfer to a bowl of ice water and allow the corn to cool. Use a decobber or sharp knife to remove the kernels from the cob. Pour kernels evenly onto dehydrator trays.

 

Suggested thickness: Individual kernels

 

Drying time: Six to eight hours for fresh; 8 to 10 hours for frozen

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Brittle

 

Blanching requirements: See above.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Soak 1 cup corn in 2¼ cups water for half an hour. Or, add directly to soup, stew, and skillet meals.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like fresh cooked

 

Yield: 2 cups fresh corn kernels = 1 cup dried corn kernels = 1½ cups rehydrated corn

 

 

Eggplant

Useful for Italian eggplant and tomato casseroles, eggplant will darken if not blanched before processing for storage. Oriental eggplant is long and thin and has a milder flavor than standard grocery store eggplant. It makes an excellent

 

garden crop for USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 4 to 11.

 

Clean: For nonorganic eggplant, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. For organic eggplant, wash with warm water and pat dry.

 

How to prepare: Dice, slice, or cube. Prepare as you would use in recipes.

 

Suggested thickness: ¼ inch thick

 

Drying time: 6 to 12 hours

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Leathery

 

Blanching requirements: Blanch for 15 seconds in boiling water.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Combine eggplant and cool water in even ratio, and then soak for 30 minutes.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: A bit leathery, but the flavor is excellent, like cooked eggplant.

Yield: 2 cups fresh eggplant = 1 cup dried eggplant = 1¼ cups rehydrated eggplant

 

 

Figs

Figs are extremely sticky as they dry. Be sure that they do not overlap or they will stick together. Consider using parchment paper on the trays for easy cleanup. Be sure to use only ripe fruit for this project. Before storage, lightly toss your figs with sugar if they stick together.

 

Clean: For nonorganic figs, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. Wash organic figs with warm water and pat dry.

 

How to prepare: For fresh figs, remove stems and cut out blemishes. Pierce the skin if drying whole small figs.

 

Suggested thickness: Cut in half or quarter. Place figs on the tray skin-side down.

 

Drying time: Time varies. Start checking at eight hours; could take up to 24 hours to finish. Turning the fruit may speed up the process.

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Leathery and flexible

 

Blanching requirements: If drying figs whole, plunge in boiling water for 30 seconds.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Pour enough boiling water to cover, then let sit for 30 minutes.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Not typically rehydrated. Used dried as snacks and in recipes.

 

Yield: 2 cups fresh fig pieces = 1 cup dried figs

 

 

Garlic

Garlic seasoning is a pantry staple at our home; we use it with almost every meal. Garlic is planted in the fall after the first frost, and there are over 50 different varieties of soft-neck and hard-neck garlic adapted to every growing region.

 

If you are not the gardening type, purchase large jars of organic garlic from a big box store and save yourself a lot of chopping time. A 32-ounce container will run you around $14 and make approximately 8 ounces of garlic powder when it’s dried.

 

Clean: For organic and nonorganic garlic, separate and peel cloves, then remove root ends.

 

How to prepare: Slice with a mandoline or chop in a food processor.

 

Suggested thickness: See above.

 

Drying time: 6 to 12 hours

 

Temperature: 125°F

 

Consistency when dry: Crisp

 

Blanching requirements: N/A

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Use as a powder or break into bits for soup or stir-fry.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Like cooked

 

Yield: 1 cup fresh garlic = ¼ cup dehydrated garlic = ¾ cup rehydrated garlic

 

 

Ginger

Candied ginger is expensive, so we make our own. The cooking process also makes ginger syrup, which can be bottled and used for ginger ale, on pancakes, or drizzled over your favorite oatmeal.

 

Clean: For organic and nonorganic ginger, wash with warm water and dry.

 

How to prepare: Peel if making candied ginger.

 

Suggested thickness: ⅛-inch slices

 

Drying time: Four to six hours

 

Temperature: 135°F

 

Consistency when dry: Pliable

 

Blanching requirements: No need to cook if chopping for ground ginger.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: Not usually rehydrated. Instead, chop and use in salads, cookies, gingerbread, or in herbal tea.

 

Consistency when rehydrated: N/A

 

Yield: 1 cup fresh ginger = ½ cup dried ginger = ¾ cup rehydrated ginger

 

 

Grapes

If you are lucky enough to grow your own grapes, you have an advantage. Commercially grown grapes are notorious for pesticide residue and are consistently in the top 10 of the Environmental Working Group (EWG) list of “Dirty Dozen”9. Pay special attention to cleaning your nonorganic grapes before dehydrating.

 

Clean: For nonorganic grapes, follow the cleaning tips on remembering tips. Wash organic grapes with warm water, then dry.

 

How to prepare: Remove from stems after blanching.

 

Suggested thickness: Leave whole

 

Drying time: 15 to 30 hours, depending on size

 

Temperature: 135°F

 

Consistency when dry: Pliable

 

Blanching requirements: Dip in boiling water for 30 seconds, then into ice water to cool. This makes the skins ready for processing and reduces the drying time by half.

 

Oxidizing treatment: N/A

 

How to rehydrate: N/A

 

Consistency when rehydrated: Dried grapes are raisins and cannot be reconstituted. Use dried in recipes or for snacks.

 

Yield: 1 cup fresh grapes = ¼ cup raisins

Dried and powdered grape leaves make a nice tea. Wash the leaves and pat dry. Pile the grapes on dehydrator trays, no more than ½ inch thick, then stir after three hours. Dry at 90°F for approximately six hours, or until crisp.

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